From Vallila’s wooden houses to Jätkäsaari – Helsinki housing company has 200 wooden residential buildings

Jätkäsaari
28.7.2020
The oldest wooden housing of the City of Helsinki housing company Heka were completed in the early1900s. Heka’s new wood construction is represented by the two multi-storey apartment buildings in the Wood City complex of Jätkäsaari completed last year.

The oldest wooden housing of the City of Helsinki housing company Heka were completed in the early 1900s. Heka’s new wood construction is represented by the two multi-storey apartment buildings in the Wood City complex of Jätkäsaari completed last year.

Heka (Helsingin kaupungin asunnot Oy) has slightly over 200 wood-framed residential buildings. The oldest of the wooden houses are located in Käpylä and Vallila. Heka’s wooden multi-storey apartment buildings can be found in two areas: Pukinmäki and Jätkäsaari.

Irrespective of the property, the residents of old wooden houses are responsible for yard maintenance, stairwell cleaning and snow removal.

Heka’s old wooden houses rely on natural ventilation. The functionality of this type of ventilation is dependent on the residents’ own activities.

Fire safety is of particular importance for residents of wooden buildings.

Living in a wooden building requires more communal attitude and attention to others compared with living in other types of housing.

Examples of Heka’s wooden housing:
Puu-Vallila wooden house district, Vallilantie 19: 42 residential buildings and 225 units

Seven wooden housing blocks in the Kansanasunnot property of Puu-Käpylä, with a total of 82 residential buildings and 360 units: Pellervontie 15Pohjolankatu 9Pohjolankatu 14Pohjolankatu 17 and Pohjolankatu 22

Kumpula, Kymintie46: nine residential buildings and 72 units

Jätkäsaari Wood City,  Välimerenkatu 3: two residential buildings and 98 units

Pukinmäki, Eskolantie4: a total of 51 units

Myllypuro, Ryynimyllynkatu2: eight 1- and 2-storey buildings in Puu-Myllypuro

Read more:

Helsinkihousing company Heka (site in Finnish only)

Photo: Heka